Manav Ekta | Inner Transformation – by Sri M

This is the case with us human beings too. We go about, searching for that elusive Truth, not knowing that it lies hidden within us. Understanding this and achieving an inner transformation is key to implementing the external change we hope to see in the world. Manav Ekta, the oneness of humanity, can be achieved solely through such sublime inner change.

Kabir Das, mystic poet and saint of India, would often recount this story about the musk deer to his followers. The musk deer, a deer species from the lower Himalayas, searches for the aroma of the musk, which emanates from its own body in a certain season. Frantically searching for the aroma, it buries its snout in thorny bushes hurting itself not realizing the aroma comes from within its body. 

This is the case with us human beings too. We go about, searching for that elusive Truth, not knowing that it lies hidden within us. Understanding this and achieving an inner transformation is key to implementing the external change we hope to see in the world. Manav Ekta, the oneness of humanity, can be achieved solely through such sublime inner change.

There are two ways of living life: one, the normal, usual life where we follow our senses and, two, the exceptional life, where we turn inwards to find solutions to our problems. Once we understand that a sliver of the ever-present ‘Parabrahma’ is resident within us, we start experiencing Sat-Chit-Ananda. In our schools, we must educate both teachers and children to keep their body fit as only a fit body can have a fit mind.  At the age of 66, I have set out on this padayatra called Walk of Hope, from Kanyakumari to Kashmir.  Meeting this physical challenge with a limited body is possible if we practice right living and do the ‘sadhana’ required to achieve seemingly impossible tasks and responsibilities.

There is nothing more transforming than the beauty of giving—the heart of compassion. Sri Guru Nanak Dev knew a rich miser named Dhuni Chand, who only lived to hoard. Guru Nanak once gave the latter a needle. Puzzled, the rich miser asked, “A needle, my Lord?! What do I do with this?” Guru Nanak said casually “Oh, keep it safely and return it to me when you meet me in heaven,” Dhuni asked haplessly, “How, my Lord, how? Surely I am not going to carry this needle there.” Guru replied, “That is it, my son, that is it. Then, why accumulate wealth, instead of using it for the good of others?”

I recommend Yoga, Dhyana and Pranayama along with systematic food habits for this inner makeover. In addition to this, practice meditation regularly – both in the morning and evening so that the mind is calm and one is able to maintain equanimity. In this modern age, the greatest antidote for stress, domestic or corporate, is meditation. With constant practice, changes happen in the heart. During this padayatra, I keep reminding my sahayatris—my fellow travelers—that they must also undertake an inner yatra of transformation. They should constantly observe and listen to themselves to realize what needs to change, what has to be acquired and what needs to be ejected in order to purify the mind.

There is great wisdom in turning our mind inward. Focus on the heart peacefully. If this is not practiced, the walk to Kashmir is just a physical adventure.

Sri M

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